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Showing posts from June, 2018

Review of Greg Boyd's "Cross vision: How the crucifixion of Jesus makes sense of Old Testament violence"

Gregory S. Boyd, 2017, Cross vision: How the crucifixion of Jesus makes sense of Old Testament violence (Minneapolis: Fortress).Shortly before this book was published, Greg Boyd published a massive two-volume scholarly work, The crucifixion of the warrior God: Interpreting the Old Testament’s violent portraits of God in light of the Cross(which, I confess, I have not read). It took Boyd ten years to research and write. Its subtitle sums up its theme: How do we interpret the Old Testament (OT) tales of God’s violence in the light of the totally loving, never coercive God revealed in Jesus? The present book is a much shorter presentation of Boyd’s answer to this question, aimed at a wider Christian audience.Boyd’s question presupposes that we should reinterpret the Old Testament by viewing it through the lens of the New, and his compelling examples are the New Testament writers themselves, not to mention the risen Jesus, who re-expounded the OT scriptures to his listeners on the road t…

Review of Gregory S. Boyd (2001), Satan and the Problem of Evil: Constructing a trinitarian warfare theodicy (IVP Academic, Downers Grove IL).

Gregory S. Boyd, 2001. Satan and the problem of evil: Constructing a trinitarian warfare theodicy. Downers Grove IL: IVP Academic.Why I read this bookDo you believe that God is sovereign and has everything under his control? Do you believe that he determines the future? And yet you still ask him to do things that would have him change his mind and change that that future? Is this you? I know it’s me, and I know it's seemingly paradoxical thinking.It was a search for answers to this paradox that took me to Gregory S. Boyd’s Satan and the problem of evil: Constructing a trinitarian warfare theodicy (Downers Grove IL: 2001). I certainly wouldn’t have read it for its title. But it isn’t really about Satan. It’s about the topic of the subtitle (which didn’t mean much to me at first). I had read somewhere that in this book Greg presents his version of Open Theism, a school of theology I wanted to know more about, and the only proponent of Open Theism whom I knew a bit about and respecte…